Archive for September, 2016

The Rio Olympics – what will be the legacy for girls?

30 Sep

jo-hackett-2-croppedAs I sit here pondering how to welcome a Paralympic champion back into school and how to celebrate her phenomenal achievements, I start to wonder what will be the legacy from her performances and those of all the other exceptionally talented individuals at both the Olympics and Paralympics. There is no doubt that Ellie Robinson has surpassed all expectations, even her own, by winning a Gold and a Bronze medal in Rio in the S6 swimming classification, but what do her achievements mean to everyone else? Yes, the whole school has been behind her, yes we are exceptionally proud of her, yes we love her ‘gangster poolside entry’ but what will the legacy be?

 

Perhaps she will inspire others to strive to achieve their goals and feel that they can achieve against the odds? Perhaps she will encourage younger pupils to develop their swimming by swimming in the same pool that she has? Perhaps her success will remind people of avenues that sport can open up or the risks that we have to take in order to achieve at the highest level in any field?

 

 

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Alongside this success perhaps we need to consider how we can inspire the young women of our generation of the benefits to taking part in sport and exercise. It is a worrying statistic that a third of girls aged between 8 and 16 think that vigorous exercise is socially unacceptable. Why? Sport has been all over social media for the summer of 2016. So can the success from Rio highlight how sport can help in all aspects of life. It was a wonderful opportunity to see that if you work hard, develop as a team and take risks anything is possible. One of the main Olympic highlights was the gold medal for the GB hockey team, not just because of the development as a team but also as this is one the major sports played by all girls in their time at school. Their victory showed that self-belief goes a long way. Sam Quek said the following before the women’s hockey final;

 

That gold is ours. We know we can take this all the way, if it’s between heart, skill and passion, then I don’t think we can be beaten.

“Ever since we landed in Rio, I’ve known this was going to be something special. We’ve put everything into training, we’ve left nothing to chance, we’re an incredible unit and that will be enough. We will win gold.”

 

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The Olympics is a chance for women’s and men’s sport to be on a level playing field, however, out of the 69 medals won by team GB at the Olympics only 24 of these were won by women, only 35%. Why is this? Sport for a number of girls is still not ‘cool’ and in a society where social media is the way forward we need to consider how to motivate our young performers of the future. Laura Trott explains that the reason she got into cycling was that her mum used to cycle to lose weight so she went with her. Is image the main driving factor for women in sport?

 

Jessica Ennis-Hill, Eleanor Simmonds, Laura Trott are all names which we have seen so often in the press who have had such a positive effect on the ethos of women’s sport and what it is possible for women to achieve. They are all ordinary people who have pushed themselves and strived to achieve a goal that at times would have seemed impossible, but they didn’t give up. Is this not the biggest message for people to take from the Olympics and possibly even more from the Paralympics? Nothing comes easily and everyone in order to achieve in every field has to be prepared to take a risk and fail. In order to win you have to be prepared to lose, however, winning takes on many different forms. Perhaps this is the legacy from the summer of 2016, we are as proud of Ellie Robinson for her 4th place swim as we are for her gold medal swim.

 

Maybe we should all be more like Ellie and take every opportunity that is in front of us and make the most of it regardless of social media, friendship groups, what is on the television or any other excuses. Be like Ellie, and go for it!

 

Mrs Jo Hackett,

 

Director of Sport

Time and False Noses

9 Sep


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The summer holiday has about it a different quality from all other times of the year.   While the school premises team are, if anything, busier than ever in the summer break when most of the development and major maintenance work gets done, there is still a feeling of ‘powering down’ in July and August.

 

There has, of course, been much debate about the pros and cons of the long summer break for schools with Mr Gove’s bid in 2013 to cut short the summer holiday being one of his few reforms not to be achieved.  It is certainly true that, in one sense, it is a throwback to a long-past society with different priorities.  Michaelmas in September, traditionally the time to celebrate the harvest coming in, is nowadays a minor punctuation mark in the Christian calendar but, at one time, it was a major event in the year.  The effective start of the farming year, it became the time to employ new staff, begin a rental on a new property – in effect the start of the ‘official’ year.  It made sense for university terms to fall into line with this rhythm and, in time, schools duly followed suit.

 

Most children nowadays do not have to help bring the harvest home in the summer (although I know of at least a handful of girls locally who help on the family farm and am pleased to take this opportunity to congratulate Louise Penn as she prepares to start a degree course in Agriculture at Newcastle University).

 

It is understandable, too, that parents feel keenly the pressure of finding childcare for younger and meaningful activities for their older children and also resent the fact that flight and package holidays suddenly soar in price immediately after term ends.  Equally, teachers learn, as part of their training, to smile benignly while keeping their thoughts to themselves when ribbed by friends (and sometimes even slight acquaintances) about ‘those long holidays.’

 

edmund-leachAs I began to gear up for the new term after a wonderful summer break, I found myself reflecting on this topic and asking myself whether the special quality of the summer holiday goes beyond the obvious benefit of a rest when the weather is generally fine.  Revisiting an essay, entitled ‘Time and False Noses,’  written in the 1960s by Cambridge-based anthropologist Edmund Leach, reminded me that there is much more to a school’s ‘summertime’ than easy living.

 

Anthropologists long ago noticed that all cultures divide time into ‘ordinary’ time and ‘extraordinary’ or ‘sacred’ time, when all work stopped and time was dedicated to special events and activities such as feasts and rituals. Our holydays/holidays – that extended break when we can turn off the alarm clock, and forget about bells and rules, lessons and homework – is a good example of ‘sacred’ time in this sense. Time set aside to do extraordinary things – perhaps extraordinary in the sense of exotic, or maybe just lying around doing little or nothing, in a way we cannot normally get away with.

 

This is about more than just rest.

virginia-woolfVirginia Woolf said ‘It is in our idleness…that the submerged truth sometimes comes to the top.’ And it is true that we need some time of idleness on occasions just to allow our minds to wind down and to get below the surface of what we feel about things, to think about them more deeply than we can ever hope to do day to day.

 

croppedWhere ordinary days are dedicated to work and routine, holidays are dedicated to the opposites – leisure and play, or feasts, gatherings and performances.  Traditionally, these were the main festivals of the calendar and, in our modern, secular society, the concept has been reappropriated as a social, musical or cultural event.  One thinks of Glastonbury or Edinburgh.  The GDST’s inaugural Multitude Festival, which many of our U4s enjoyed in Ipswich in July, was in the same tradition.  Leach noticed that these times were also associated with either dressing up, dressing down or even a foray into fancy dress –  what he meant by ‘false noses.’  (Think Red Nose Day.)

 

Extraordinary time makes no sense without ordinary time just as ‘holiday’ assumes ‘workaday.’  If every day were a holiday, then no day would be in fact.   Or, as Leach put it, ‘the interval between two successive festivals of the same type… is usually a named period e.g. “week”, “year.” Without the festivals, such periods would not exist, and all order would go out of social life.’  We need that contrast and, indeed, we are hard-wired at some level to thrive on it – as I was keen to emphasise to the girls in our first Assembly of the year together!

 

Incidentally, Leach also noticed that we use rituals to help us negotiate psychologically the transition from ‘sacred’ time back to ‘ordinary’ time (and vice versa) – which puts a whole new complexion on that vital purchase last week of a new pencil case when there was nothing very much wrong with the last one…

 

Whatever your summer break brought you, I hope that it was an extraordinary time and that, setting false noses aside for a while, you are ready to enjoy the marvels of the ordinary time to come.

 

Dr Helen Stringer

 

Sources

http://www.theguardian.com/politics/2013/apr/18/michael-gove-longer-school-day-holidays

http://hiebertglobalcenter.org/blog/wp-content/uploads/2013/04/Reading-8-Two-Essays-Concerning-the-Symbolic-Representation-of-Time.pdf